Archbishop, If you will…

I did not expect, on this cold yet sunny day, to be writing a response to the Archbishop of Canterbury; but upon opening my copy of today’s Mail on Sunday, my eyes were met with the headline “Archbishop: Britain split and crushed by Brexit and austerity”. The Archbishop, it appears, feels as though his job entails the same tasks as that of a political commentator. Given that the Archbishop insists upon interjecting in the lives of the non-religious, I feel that it is only fair for me to give “The Most Reverend” a piece of my own mind in return. Given his Christian nature, I am sure he will forgive me for doing so.

The Archbishop’s article begins by claiming that “we are facing our biggest challenge and shake-up to society since the Second World War”. One of the reasons for this, he believes, is the imminent arrival of the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union (or “Brexit”, to use that ugly term). The Archbishop says that he is neither “Eeyorish” nor “blandly optimistic” about Britain’s post-Brexit future, and appears to focus on the rocky social climate surrounding Brexit rather than the negotiations or possible implications to the economy. Of course, Archbishop, the first thing the conflicts surrounding Brexit needs is the running commentary of the Church (I hope the reader can sense my sarcasm).

However, all was not bad in his public address. I shall give the Archbishop credit where credit is due, despite my disapproval of his interjection as an official man of the cloth. He expressed his concerns with growing inequality, and his words on the tragedy that struck Grenfell Tower, which he described as “a metaphor for our collective failings, shows us that that we need a moral revolution in housing that centres on people”, were rather moving. He was also right to point out that austerity “is crushing the weak, the sick and many others”. Those words will resonate with a large proportion of the general public. The Archbishop, however, made the age-old mistake of commenting on politics whilst trying to remain apolitical. His written piece was quite clearly an attack on the Conservative Party, but it appears that the Archbishop knows he can only push his luck so far in the realm of politics.

The Archbishop finished his article with a flurry of Christianity (as one would perhaps expect from the Archbishop of Canterbury). His closing statement made it clear, at least according to him, that “it is the duty of the Church and of all us to reimagine what it means to be this remarkable nation in the 21st Century”. The Archbishop is correct to point out that Britain is “suffering from a lack of such common values”, as he was right to say the things he said about Grenfell. But the last thing this country needs is more interference in political matters from the Church (as an institution). Of course, Archbishop Welby is not the first of his line to stick his oar in clouded waters. Again, I shall give Archbishop Welby credit, and praise him for not going as far as his predecessor, Rowan Williams, who called for Sharia Law to be introduced in the United Kingdom for those who wanted it.

Despite the fact that I have many agreements with the Archbishop, we simply cannot have the Church constantly trying to put its foot in the door of politics. The Archbishop can vote as he pleases, he can favour whichever economic system he pleases, and he can be as nostalgic about the Christian days of old as he likes, but he cannot do so on his own terms; and his religious position should not, by any means, give him a national platform to comment on such issues. His opinion must remain an ordinary opinion. If Archbishop Welby wishes to influence government policy he shall have his opportunity at the polling station; he can go one step further, if he wishes, and abandon his Holy post and stand for Parliament. It must also be said that both the Mail and the Archbishop have, perhaps, overestimated the power of Welby’s position. Many people, based upon the reactions I have read online, have expressed concern at the political nature of the Archbishop’s public address, including some Christians who are in absolute agreement with him. Like many other people, my heart sinks when I see an “official” religious figure making political statements (especially when they are doing so in the national press!). Call me cynical, but before I had even read the Archbishop’s piece, I was ready to throw it into the fire of eternal damnation.

How can the Conservative Party win over the Youth?

Firstly, I feel obliged to point out that I actually didn’t vote for the Conservatives in the 2017 General Election. Instead I voted for the Labour Party, despite being fairly torn towards the party leader Jeremy Corbyn for various reasons (none of which I will cover in this blog post). This seems to be a consistent theme for my fellow millennials. Under Corbyn’s spell, the turnout for 18-24 years old surged from 43% in 2015 to 66.4% in 2017, with 63% of those young people voting for Labour (source: Sky News). So, given the statistics, it was no surprise that Tory MP Damian Green recently said that the Conservative Party must “change hard” to win over the youth. No matter how old (or young) you are, or where your political allegiances lie, it is simply impossible to deny that the Conservative Party are failing to win over young voters, especially when it comes to getting those voters to turn up to the ballot box in the first place. We must now ask ourselves, with Damian Green’s comments in mind, what must the Conservatives do to inspire the youth?

To begin with, we must contemplate whether the problem is actually the Tories, or is it perhaps the millennials themselves? Yes… We need to talk about my fellow millennials, and I’m no longer afraid to say it. (although, as an anti-Tory, I will rush to say that I think the problem lies with both the Tories and the youth). The “problem”, so to speak, with the millennials is clearly reflected on many of our university campuses and social media platforms. A huge proportion of the politically engaged youth, for various reasons, seem to have an obsession with playing the victim. “Safe space policies” are ripe on our university campuses, and identity politics is seemingly more popular than ever. However, I feel as though it is important to remember that the youth have always been radicals; which 16-year-old doesn’t want to free the working classes from their chains, right? So, naturally, many of these millennials may shift to the centre of the political spectrum, in that all-so cliché way. Corbyn has, to his credit, hacked into this social climate. His slogans, campaign material and policies were often centred around equity, state-funded opportunity and giving the future of Britain a helping hand. But before I put forth a potential Conservative alternative to solve such issues, I will swing the gun of criticism from the youth, and point it firmly in the direction of the Tories.

One of the most obvious problems with the Conservatives is their image, or at least how the youth perceive that image. Despite Theresa May’s fairly modest upbringing as the daughter of a vicar, the Conservatives still continue their age-old tradition of being a posh boys club. Everything from the media to technology has changed, and it is very easy for the computer savvy youth to look past the mainstream media and discover the history behind key Conservative figures. It is only natural for an 18-year-old working class student to look at Boris Johnson’s Etonian upbringing and think: “How could that person possibly know what is best for me?”. Something simply must shift in the Conservative Party’s image; they cannot survive on their current dose of Etonians and Bullingdon Boys. As history proves, Prime Ministers are more than often elected based upon how connected a television viewer feels whilst watching them deliver a speech in the comfort of their own home.

But, of course, politics shouldn’t be about personality. The Conservative Party’s policies are unpopular with the youth, as well as many older people too. Most strikingly, it is the economic policy of austerity which has disgusted and angered the vast majority of young voters. The education, NHS and Social Care systems seem to be severely underfunded, and understandably this is a huge worry for many a voter. In order to win over some young voters, the Conservative Party simply must make a giant U-turn on austerity, and bring it to an end once and for all. Some have argued that they should do the opposite, and make the noble case for austerity. However, with many economists torn on the issue, it seems near impossible to sell the policy as an “economic necessity”, as they have done in the past.

As equally as damaging as the problem of austerity, in my opinion, is the lack of Conservative principles. With Labour’s shift to the Left, Theresa May scrambled desperately in the dark chasms of Blairism in a pathetic attempt to snap up those Labour voters who felt alienated by Jeremy Corbyn. But, as Fraser Nelson said in his latest article for The Spectator, “If voters are sold Labour ideas, they’ll buy them from the Labour Party”. So, what should the Conservative Party be offering the electorate? And more importantly, which kind of alternative to Labour and the status-quo can the Tories offer young voters?

Of course, given my political preferences, I am more than happy to be accused of being biased at this point. But, I feel as though a shift towards Classical Liberalism and conservatism (with a small “c”) would offer the youth something to believe in. It feels as though the Conservatives have abandoned the importance of liberty and the individual. By developing such principles, and deeply rooting them in their future policies, the youth (and everybody else, for that matter) could have an alternative to the identity politics which is flourishing within our university campuses, faculties and society in general. It seems cliché and predictable, especially coming from myself, but if the Conservative Party even want me to consider donating my vote to them, they must make an extreme shift away from their fetish for the Neo-Liberal economy, and place all emphasis on the crucial values of freedom, individuality and opportunity for all.