Why Are Our Politicians so Awful?

The answer to the above question is one that I have been trying to put my finger on for a very, very long time. It is only up until recently that I have felt able enough to create a clear and articulated opinion on the matter, and even then, I do not doubt many of you will disagree with me on this subject. The question of “why are our politicians so awful?” is one that we might never be able to answer. I would like to begin by confessing that I have made a very sweeping statement already – and I am willing to concede that all politicians might not be awful (or at least not equally as awful).

My conclusion on this subject is a simple one: politics has shifted from the world of philosophy, and into one of popular culture. That is to say that the philosophical backbone behind the politicians and their views has, over time, been removed. If we look at past political figures such as Edmund Burke, John Stuart Mill, Benjamin Franklin, Benjamin Disraeli, Thomas Jefferson (to name just a few), these people were philosophers both inside and outside of their respected political arenas. Many of them even branched outside of the realm of political philosophy, and into other unrelated philosophical topics. Of course, this is not to say that they are without their faults. Especially given the time period in which these people lived, some of them might have held views many of us in the 21st Century might find distasteful.

In replacement of this philosophical backbone, our politicians and their parties now search for votes in the world of pop culture. Our politicians were once serious thinkers, but nowadays our election campaigns and debates are filled with empty slogans, rhetoric and sometimes even “banter”. The best example of this shift towards popular culture is the actions and campaign techniques of our former Prime Minister Tony Blair, who attempted to paint himself as some kind of Rockstar figure. During the dizzy heights of New Labour’s rule, Blair was often painted by the media as a “cool” guy. He was often pictured carrying his guitar, showing off his torso, or surrounded by many crazed supporters on some kind of imaginary red carpet. This is a technique that is yet to die, and I can only see it getting worse. Recently, politicians have seemingly reverted to millennial “banter”, and some have even played off internet memes and jokes to try and increase their popularity and make themselves look more “in-touch”.

Are we doomed? Is there hope? The truth is I think we are all doomed to play witness to this kind of politics until our final days. It is clear to me that we need some serious philosophical thinkers within all our political parties, but I see no sign of that occurring in the near or distant future. I think the best way for this to happen would be the creation of a new party (or maybe even parties), but this is mere fantasy. Perhaps because of the strength and mass presence of modern day media we have doomed ourselves to reduce politics to mere slogans and jokes. But surely that is just an excuse? I think the only remedy for this modern day political nonsense is for the electorate to start demanding what they deserve: genuine politicians, who think long and hard about their political philosophy and ideas, and back those thoughts up with principled action.